Broadus on Boyce

Broadus on Boyce

Broadus On Boyce from Bret Capranica on Vimeo. A Gentleman and a Scholar: A Memoir of James Petigru Boyce, John A. Broadus John A. Broadus, an original faculty member, and the second President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, writes a warm and thorough account of the life and ministry of his good friend, and the first President of Southern Seminary, James Petigru Boyce.   Published in 1893, Broadus”™s biography is an excellent illustration of life in antebellum and post-Civil War America. The first third of the book is devoted to the early life and education of Boyce.  It is an excellent review of the providential circumstances that prepared Boyce to be a scholar and one devoted to training others in biblical scholarship and pastoral ministry.  The majority of the book, however, is devoted more to a history of the founding and early days of Southern Seminary, emphasizing Boyce”™s critical life investment. Boyce is pictured as an avid reader, intense in increasing his knowledge throughout his entire life.  From boyhood to the end of his life, Broadus depicts Boyce”™s thirst to grow.  He is also shown to be a icon of perseverance, as Broadus describes Boyce”™s unflagging commitment to start and sustain Southern Seminary despite the enormous set backs from the civil war which included divesting Boyce of much of his personal wealth.  Even to his last days, Boyce was immersed in promoting and securing the seminary”™s future.  It is a fascinating and convicting look into a life of focus, discipline, and perseverance. Broadus”™ book is also an excellent look into how Southern Baptists, like Boyce, functioned during the tumultuous...

Wells and the Wasteland 1

In my quiet time, I begin by reading from a book that will stimulate my mind and heart about sanctification or practical life in the church. Recently I have begun reading God in the Wasteland by David F. Wells. I want to share a few excerpts from his book that I noted during my fifteen minute-a-day reading time. On the current reactions against formal theological training: Noting the how the early colonial American trends in the mainline schools were producing polished institutions, there was a strong reactions against them. “This ambitious drive [among the intellectual schools of colonial America] produces some savage anti-clericalism but also because the insurgent leaders were “Ëintent on destroying the monopoly of classically educated and university trained clergymen.’ Their sermons were colloquial, “Ëemploying daring pulpit storytelling, no-holds-barred appeals, overt humor, strident attacks, graphic application, and intimate personal experience.’ The point of it all was to engage the audience. Charles Finney despised sermons that were formally delivered on the grounds that they put content ahead of communication, and, although both he and Dwight L. Moody had their own theologies, they both vigorously opposed “Ëthe formal study of divinity'” (65). “‘As the common man rose in power n the early republic,’ says Hatch, “Ëthe inevitable consequence was the displacement from power of the uncommon man, the man of ideas.’ Never again, he adds would America produce people of the caliber of Adams, Jefferson, and Madison in the realm of politics or of Jonathan Edwards in the realm of theology” (67). In light of some of what we have seen in the modern Seeker Sensitive and Emergent Church...

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