Cap-Quotes: Calvin and His Company of Pastors

Cap-Quotes: Calvin and His Company of Pastors

A friend recently recommended I read  Scott M. Manetsch’s book, Calvin’s Company of Pastors: Pastoral Care and the Emerging Reformed Church, 1536-1609. How grateful I am for the suggestion. It is a fascinating look into the spiritual life of Geneva during and after Calvin’s public ministry there. Here are a few thoughts from a portion of the book. From the time of John Calvin’s coming to Geneva until the beginning of the seventeenth century, more than 130 pastors participated in what was referred to as Geneva’s Venerable Company of Pastors. These shepherds sought to oversee not only the ongoing work of the Reformation, but the practical shepherding of the churches in and around the city of Geneva. The following are quotes from the book that I have found interesting as to how these shepherds sought to oversee the flock of God among them. So much is the same, little has changed. Regarding one of the final meetings John Calvin had with his colleagues in ministry: . . . he exhorted his pastoral colleagues to be on guard against all religious innovation in the future. “I beg you also to change nothing and to avoid innovation,” Calvin stated, “not because I am ambitious to preserve my own work. . . but because all changes are dangerous, and sometimes even harmful.” 1 On establishing and maintaining right worship: Calvin identified two principal qualities of authentic Christian worship: it is spiritual and it is dependent upon the divine Word. Worship is “spiritual” in that it originates in the ministry of the Holy Spirit who initiates faith in the Christian man or woman and...
Answering Hot Topics – Am I a Calvinist?

Answering Hot Topics – Am I a Calvinist?

Am I a Calvinist? from Bret Capranica on Vimeo. As you might imagine, I am often asked about this.  Obviously, I have openly identifed myself with Calvinism in some regard, but when really pushed on this issue I don’t have any desire to publicly defend myself as a Calvinist.  That’s not because I’m ashamed of what I believe or with whom it may associate me, nor am I trying to duck behind a facade and not answer tough questions.  I really do have an aversion to many of these sorts of public theological labels. Admittedly, I am probably inconsistent in my aversion.  I don’t mind being called a Baptist, even though I abhor some of the caricatures, but I am not dogmatic in defending myself as an ardent Dispensationalist, though I would hold a number of its tenets. Why I have an aversion to theological labels. 1.  Labels tend to avoid biblical discussion. If I simply come out and publicly identify myself as a Calvinist or even a Dispensationalist, the conversation with many immediately ceases and we tend to go no further without any real biblical interaction over the issues.  Or, association with a particular label often leads to a mere discussion of whose syllogism is most logical.  Maybe that has its place, but not fundamentally.  Why begin, not with “are you a . . . “ but with “how do you understand this biblical passage, or that doctrinal implication.”  I have no interest in defending Calvinism per se.   I have great interest in discussing biblical texts and how we come to certain conclusions about them. 2.  Labels...
Page 1 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest